High fructose corn syrup is one the most common ingredients found in a lot of different food items, especially food mass-produced by corporations. Coca-Cola, Stove Top Stuffing, Kellogg’s cereals, Capri-Sun, as well as various candies, condiments, sweets and breads all contain the additive.

Related: The Full List Of Products Containing High Fructose Corn Syrup.

But a new study out this week shows that consuming even what you would consider to be ‘normal’ quantities of high fructose corn syrup is considerably more toxic than consuming sucrose or table sugar, and can lead to diminished reproductive health and inevitably a shorter life span.

The study shows that when female mice were fed a diet containing 25% of calories from added fructose and glucose carbohydrates found in corn syrup, they fell ill and died at a rate of 1.87 times higher than female mice on a diet in which 25% of calories came from table sugar.

“This is the most robust study showing there is a difference between high-fructose corn syrup and table sugar at human-relevant doses,” says biology professor Wayne Potts, senior author of a new study scheduled for publication in the March 2015 print issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

This research is among the first to differentiate between the effects of the fructose-glucose mixture found in corn syrup and regular table sugar, and the results are remarkable, stark, and clear.

“When the diabetes-obesity-metabolic syndrome epidemics started in the mid 1970’s, they corresponded with both a general increase in consumption of added sugar and the switchover from sucrose being the main added sugar in the American diet to high-fructose corn syrup making up half our sugar intake,” says Waye Potts, senior author of the paper and University of Utah biology professor.

Even with this new information, food corps are still working hard to peddle high fructose corn syrup containing products to the public. They’ve even tried renaming the ingredient so they can label their products as high fructose corn syrup free to trick customers into buying their products.

At the end of the day, we have no choice but to know the industry’s tricks and read the labels. Read. The. Labels. It’s the only way to know for certain the contents of our products.

Image credit: Steven Vance, Flickr